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20121027
20121104
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KRCB (PBS) 10
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but this election is different. today digital technology has given campaigns the ability to take that data and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to just the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be
about by forces that are larger than our own society, globalization, the reach of technology and channg demographics. and within that, i felt that america was at a time when we desperately needed to have the strongest possible value space. we needed to be more in touch with the best of the american idea, the best aspects of the american idea. >> brown: value space you say. well, i say the value space. the space where we talk about why we do things, not what we're going to do. i felt that space had emptied out. we had had a very tough first decade of this century. i thought the conservate vision of small government, low tas, big defense, had played itself out and that progressives, liberals, we were flat on our back. >> brown: you use this term hand making i implies a sense of craft, a hands-on. your own background i know from being involved in folklore and music. >> yes. i'm a folklorist and amuse i cannologist. that colors my perspective. i reach back for the foundation of my argument to the late 19th century, to that other transition, the industrial revolution, and the krettics who p
in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water clos
groups use of technology. he also echoed others about the voters themselves. >> they're very independent minded. they are hard-working, working class citizens that vote for the person. they think the person is the best-- the person that most exemplifies who they are and will do the best job for them. so i think what you see here in green bay is a microcosm of what you see all across this state, the people want a new direction. >> reporter: given recent shifts here, though, the question in wisconsin remains: which really is the new direction? one prominent local citizen isn't tipping his hand. we met green bay mayor jim schmitt at a.l.s. hamburger shop. i noticed you're not endorsing either candidate. why's that? >> no. you what... what? look, i'm the mayor. i know who i want to be mayor, but when it comes to... >> reporter: you feel good about that one! >> i feel pretty good about that endorsement. >> reporter: mayor schmitt may be the smartest politician around. with a constituency fiercely divided and independent, he directed us to his own house a few blocks away. there we found one si
that we see and how much of it is what is ta ted about it as structural issues, changing technology,ed globalization, a kind of new normal that we've heard about from many pple? >> well -- >> i think-- hold on, let me go withpustan goolsbee here first. >> okay. >> okay, so two parts of the how much of the unemployment rate is coming from structural, i think not that high. i do think that is the thing that the economy is going to have to do. the fundamental reason why this recession loo a lot a like the 2001 recovery and not the 1983 recovery is we can't go back to doing what we were doing before the recession began. just as in 2001 a bubble popped and then you're trying to shift what the economy is doing. so there is some element of that. but we also have b got a significant component as i saof the whole world has slowed down. the u.s. growth rate while not fast enough is faster than the rest of the advanced world. so we've got to find a way to get ourselves boosted up where we're not getting any support from being leng to increase our exports to other countries when that is exactly th
and technology. but its position has been challenged and, in some ways, surpassed by apple, google and others in recent years. some question its ability to innovate. now, microsoft is facing a pivotal moment and a crucial test, as ray suarez reports. ( applause ) >> it really is an exciting, exciting day. >> suarez: like other c.e.o.s, microsoft's steve ballmer often tries to generate buzz with his product launches. but the company's big event in new york yesterday had a different vibe. the company's well-known operating system, now called windows 8, is getting its biggest makeover in nearly two decades for the first time, windows' design is built around touch- screen capabilities and utilizes "apps" similar to its competitors that microsoft calls "live tiles." the software went on sale today as part of a global launch in countries like japan and china. the company is aiming directly at the mobile device market. >> what we've done is actually re-imagined windows, and we've re-imagined essentially the whole p.c. industry. in addition to notebooks and desktops, we introduced the p.c. as tablet,
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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